Easily Frustrated

Oct 5
spmstraighta:

Aerobic VS Anaerobic Respiration

spmstraighta:

Aerobic VS Anaerobic Respiration

Sep 8

Bleh, can’t understand why brother loves this

Sep 8

Feel like posting food pics…

(Source: bzfd.it)

Aug 2

Earlier this week on Monday with apartment mates and coworker~ should have been studying for finals but oh wells.
Place is called monster located in Tustin. Great service and fantastic fish to rice ratio for ayce.

Back in those days when I believed that if you put enough salt and sugar together it will even out and taste fine….

Simple names for surgical operations

daughter-of-sevenless:

-tomy: The surgeon cut something.

-ectomy: The surgeon cut something out.

-ostomy: The surgeon cut something to make a mouth. If one organ is named, the mouth opened to the outside of the patient. If two organs are named, the mouth connected two organs.

-plasty: The surgeon changed the shape of an organ.

-pexy: The surgeon moved the organ to the right place.

-rraphy: The surgeon sewed something up.

-desis: The surgeon made two things stick to one another.

(Source: pathguy.com)

Jul 4

(Source: girlcodehumor)

Jul 4

(Source: ForGIFs.com)

Jul 4
catsbeaversandducks:

"Just get in the car, Alice. I’ll explain on the way."

catsbeaversandducks:

"Just get in the car, Alice. I’ll explain on the way."

(Source: bunnyfood)

Jul 3
bpod-mrc:

01 July 2014
Medicine from Mustard
August 2014 will mark one hundred years since the outbreak of the First World War. July 1917 saw the introduction of a sinister and vicious weapon, mustard gas. Primarily it was used not to kill – though it was fatal in high enough doses – but to induce pain and suffering in an attempt to exhaust medical supplies. Victims endured blisters, blindness, vomiting and choking to death as the gas stripped bronchial tubes of the mucous membrane. Doctors noticed that those not instantly killed by the gas died weeks later with depleted bone marrow and white blood cells [immune cells]. This was the first time that they’d seen any chemical attack specific cells. Scientists theorised that perhaps another chemical could kill only cancer cells. Thus began the development of chemotherapy. Who’d have thought that a poison designed a century ago to maim and slaughter would provide a clue to eradicating cancer?
Written by Rebekah Kells
—
Adapted from image from Otis Historical Archives, National Museum of Health and MedicineScience Photo LibraryAny re-use of this image must be authorised by Science Photo Library
—
You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

01 July 2014

Medicine from Mustard

August 2014 will mark one hundred years since the outbreak of the First World War. July 1917 saw the introduction of a sinister and vicious weapon, mustard gas. Primarily it was used not to kill – though it was fatal in high enough doses – but to induce pain and suffering in an attempt to exhaust medical supplies. Victims endured blisters, blindness, vomiting and choking to death as the gas stripped bronchial tubes of the mucous membrane. Doctors noticed that those not instantly killed by the gas died weeks later with depleted bone marrow and white blood cells [immune cells]. This was the first time that they’d seen any chemical attack specific cells. Scientists theorised that perhaps another chemical could kill only cancer cells. Thus began the development of chemotherapy. Who’d have thought that a poison designed a century ago to maim and slaughter would provide a clue to eradicating cancer?

Written by Rebekah Kells

Adapted from image from Otis Historical Archives, National Museum of Health and Medicine
Science Photo Library
Any re-use of this image must be authorised by Science Photo Library

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

Welcome to Medblr.

wayfaringmd:

thecraftypremed:

Welcome to Medblr.
Medblr, /r/premed, and the premed/medical school group on twitter is the antithesis of SDN. All three are really caring and fun communities that I love being a part of, and I want other aspiring doctors to know about.

Now, I shall give you a crash course into the world of Medblr (or at least what I know of it).

Dr. CranquisWayfaring MD, and are physicians who somehow have time to chill and answer questions from premeds.  Dr. Cranquis has a ton of funny stories like this one, Wayfaring MD has a great sidebar with commonly asked questions,

Cranquis and Wayfaring have some connection to Princeton-Medbloro, which is a good guess of what a hospital would look like if run by Medblr.

Medblrs that I know for sure are medical students:


Medblrs that I know for sure are premed students:

  • whitecoatjourney
  • theaspiringdoc is one of my classmates and like me, blogs for our university’s pre-health blog. He’s currently getting ready to go on a medical mission to Honduras!
  • medicalmullings is a biochem major who is also currently writing about her experiences at her hospital job
  • thecraftypremed is the tumblr version of this blog. I rebagel anything I find useful, along with the occasional anime/haute couture/SFX makeup posts.


Other fun medicine and premed-related blogs:

Workout progress pics aren’t your thing? What about study space pics? studying-hardtheartofstudying, have some good pics, and thenormalcollegelife has that PLUS all the Grey’s Anatomy gifsets and pics you would want! 
So, here’s nearly half of my tumblr dashboard. I hope you find some fun blogs to add to your reading material, and that they help and inspire you as much as they did to me!


via Blogger http://ift.tt/1qPNUIT

A great welcome to the medblr world! Don’t forget to check out the Medblr Spotlight for more medblrs to follow! 

And come join us over at Princeton-Medbloro Teaching Hospital as well. We’re always looking for morning report lecturers. 

captain-mycaptain:

dirku:

nonomella:

that terrifying moment when everything is happily resolved but the book still has 200 pages left

that terrifying moment when there’s too many things that need resolving but the book has only 20 pages left

EITHER WAY

IT’S JUST LIKE

image

maptacular:

The Ebola outbreak that has killed hundreds of people in West Africa since it started in Guinea months ago has reached its second wave and is “totally out of control,” said an official for Doctors Without Borders.
As of Friday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention put the number of cases at 362 — more than any other outbreak on record. Ebola is extremely deadly and this outbreak has killed 330 people, according to the World Health Organization.
via the Huffington Post

maptacular:

The Ebola outbreak that has killed hundreds of people in West Africa since it started in Guinea months ago has reached its second wave and is “totally out of control,” said an official for Doctors Without Borders.

As of Friday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention put the number of cases at 362 — more than any other outbreak on record. Ebola is extremely deadly and this outbreak has killed 330 people, according to the World Health Organization.

via the Huffington Post